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Teen allegedly attacks prominent Brooklyn Heights rabbi

Brooklyn Paper
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A prominent Brooklyn Heights rabbi claims he was targeted by a group of young ruffians last week and will host a rally on Friday morning demanding peace on the neighborhood’s streets.

Rabbi Aaron Raskin from Remsen Street’s Congregation B’nai Avraham claims one of the kids punched him in the head and then tried to swipe his cellphone, and now he wants residents to send a message to other would-be criminals that they won’t stand for similar attacks in the future.

“He wants to wants to unify the community to say we’re not going to tolerate senseless hatred,” said the rabbi’s spokesman Warren Cohn.

Raskin was chatting on his cellphone while strolling down Joralemon Street near Hicks Street at 6:18 pm on Sunday, when a group of five teenagers approached him and one allegedly whacked him on the side of the head, knocking his phone to the ground, police said.

Cohn claims the group then broke out in laughter and allegedly tried to pick the phone up off the ground, before running off. The rabbi called the local police precinct and 911, and officers brought a squad car to pick him up, he said.

As they were driving down the street, Raskin spotted the kids, Cohn said. Police pulled over and arrested a 15-year-old boy for trying to steal the phone.

Raskin is now inviting locals to rally with him, other religious leaders, and local pols on the steps of the synagogue on Feb. 5 to call for safer streets.

Rally in front of Congregation B’nai Avraham [117 Remsen St. at Henry Street in Brooklyn Heights, (718) 596–4840]. Feb. 5 at 10 am.

Reach reporter Lauren Gill at lgill@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2511. Follow her on Twitter @laurenk_gill
Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

Andrew Porter from Brooklyn Heights says:
I strongly suspect this was a crime of opportunity perpetrated by teens coming and going down Joralemon to the basketball courts in Brooklyn Bridge Park. There has been an enormous upsurge in pedestrian traffic along this route since the Park opened.
Feb. 5, 2016, 1:25 pm
Law and Disorder from Brooklyn says:
When they stop letting these punks off easy then Everyone will be safe on the street.
Un cuff the police and send a message to these liberal Judges.
Feb. 5, 2016, 1:43 pm
John from Brooklyn heights says:
There all coming from redhook projects and the projects in boerum hill, they take that path from court st to the basketball courts, ever since the basketball courts opened these kids have been causing problems for the residents. They need to close that movie theater and the popeyes and the basketball courts. If you act like an animal you will be treated as one, if you want to be treated as human being then act like one.
Feb. 5, 2016, 4:54 pm
G. Durrell says:
Human beings are animals.
Feb. 6, 2016, 8:21 pm
earl david from flatbush says:
I will never forget going back to 1968, when we were living in Crown Heights that a bunch of black kids surrounded us, trying to steal my brother's basketball when my father grabbed one kid with his armed hook (he lost his hand) and they all ran away.

The bottom line is this, respect one another. We are all from same planet, we all go back to same earth. lets learn to get along with one another. I know Rabbi Raskin personally, he is a kind soul and would not hurt a fly.
Feb. 14, 2016, 8:59 am

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