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Teen turns himself in for attempting to steal woman’s cellphone on R train

Brooklyn Paper
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Cops cuffed a teen after he turned himself in for trying to snatch a woman’s cellphone on an R train earlier this month, while another baddie distracted her with a punch to the face.

The 18-year-old suspect turned himself into police at the 84th Precinct on Thursday, one week after he tried to grab the 24-year-old victim’s phone from her hand while on the Bay Ridge-bound subway on Dec. 13 around 1:40 am, police said.

Officials slapped the teen, who lives in Madison, with robbery charges, and authorities are still looking for the goon who punched the woman, according to cops.

Anyone with information in regard to this incident is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at 1-800-577-TIPS. The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the CrimeStoppers website at www.nypdcrimestopers.com, on Twitter @NYPDTips or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577. All calls are confidential.

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.
Updated 8:37 am, December 24, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

The Hunkster from Bed-Stuy says:
If the MTA could invest funding by putting closed circuit television surveillance cameras inside subway cars to catch the criminals in the act without effort.
Dec. 24, 2018, 9:42 am
The Hunkster from Bed-Stuy says:
If only ...
Dec. 24, 2018, 9:43 am
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
This is what happens when trump is elected president, folks. Expect more crime like this and worse, until he’s impeached.
Dec. 24, 2018, 11:40 am

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