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Sitter survey: Slope parents group seeks input from families with nannies

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The head mom at Park Slope’s preeminent parents group is looking to wrangle a few hundred Kings County parents to participate in a biennial nanny survey, which empowers Brooklyn families with the knowledge to net quality childcare at the right price.

“People are more confident in the decisions they make because of the information that Park Slope Parents provides,” said Dr. Susan Fox, founder of the eponymous Park Slope information exchange group, which boasts more than 6,500 members. “It’s Brooklyn’s most comprehensive survey of nanny pay standards.”

Fox has leveraged her doctorate in Communications and Social Science Research to query hundreds of Kings County nanny employers through her online survey since 2008, and her questionnaires have helped first-time parents understand the pay rates, benefits, responsibilities, and other concerns associated with hiring an in-house childcare professional.

“We’ve had nanny’s stealing alcohol, shoplifting, pocketing money for music class, so we’ve created guides on how to double check that your nanny is doing a good job,” said Fox, who noted that the vast majority of nannies are on the level, with less than one-percent of parents reporting crooked childcare.

So far, Fox has only gotten about half of the roughly 800 respondents she needs to fill out her hotly anticipated report, and the mom doctor noted that every year is a battle when it comes to getting Brooklyn’s busy nanny bosses to set aside 10 minutes to answer questions for the greater good.

“It’s a bigger and bigger challenge every year,” said Fox. “There’s just so much info coming into people’s inboxes.”

In the past, Fox has asked moms and dads if they cough up a little extra for their nanny’s MetroCard and phone expenses, but this year’s survey will be the first to questions parents on whether they feel their baby sitter’s phone habits get in the way of their chaperoning responsibilities.

“There’s definitely way too many people plugged in,” said Fox. “We’re asking whether or not parents talk to their nannies about how much time they should spend on their phones.”

Parents from across the borough still have until the end of April to participate in Fox’s survey, which she hopes to release sometime in May.

Reach reporter Colin Mixson at cmixson@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4505.
Updated 4:07 pm, April 4, 2019
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Reasonable discourse

GG says:
How about raising your kids yourself? Why would you trust a stranger?
April 4, 4:38 pm
Henry Blasey-Ford from Bay Ridge says:
She’s not a real doctor but she plays one on tv!
April 4, 8:36 pm
Def leopard says:
Lets raise taxes so poor families vsn hire nannies. Tired if ruch people getting everything handed ti them. You cant have your caje and eat it too. Choose career or kids.
April 4, 9:28 pm
Farrah Williams from Park Slope says:
If the nannies steal or step out of line, you have to punish them. Treat them just like you would your other servants. If I see a nanny or maid pilfering some alcohol, they will be beaten all the same. Once they have been whipped a few times, they will learn full submission.
April 5, 2:17 am
Shamdonkwa Jones from East New York says:
Problems like this happen all the time, but the police often ignore it because the employers are people of color. I called the police when I saw my nanny acting in a flirtatious manner with the butler - but they just laughed at me! This is beyond unacceptable!!!
April 5, 5:59 am
Henry BlowMe-Ford from Bay Ridge says:
Brooklyn sure does have a lot of whiny bichazz complainers. What happened to all the tough NY'ers? If you can afford private child care great, if not, shut yer pie hole.
April 5, 10:09 am
Chrysler from Bay ridge says:
Let these women raise their own children. Tired of this feminist nonsense. Not everyone is entitled to a career. The reverse is true also. Nothing wrong with Mr. Mom's either.
April 5, 12:12 pm
Joe okojoe says:
Title ought to be, how to spy on your slave I mean nanny.
April 5, 12:14 pm
Joe from Greenpoint says:
Ah, the age old nannie question - Haitian or Jamaican? Both cultures believe firmly in corporal punishment - so tied Both have good food but Jamaican has more variety - so Jamaica All Jamaican's smoke MJ (K Harris said so) whereas most Haitians do not - so for nannie purposes, give this one to Haiti Both cultures believe one should be contributing work to the household by age 5 - so tied Neither speak English as a native language - so tied again Jamaican only have words for four parts of the body; hand, foot, body and head - maybe not great for nannie purposes, e.g. "Ya chid urt em botty." But Haitians can curse you with voudoun. And on and on. I think this "head mom" is doing important work.
April 5, 3:23 pm
Bob from Gerritsen Beach says:
So sad that so many parents find it acceptable or coerced into believing a hired person could raise a child with the same love and compassion that they would. A few years back I walked into a coffee shop on ninth street off of fifth and noticed two nannies sitting and drinking coffee together while their strollers were propped up facing opposite walls. It couldn't be more than 18 inches between these children and a blank wall and the toddlers was just sitting there in silence. How sad is that.
April 6, 1:26 pm
Reply to Bob from Gerritsen says:
Bob, they do that in nursing homes. My mother was in one for rehab and they put her in a chair facing a wall. That is abuse. IF you ever see someone do that in public or in a home you should call them out on it. Abuse is the only word. Also a form of laziness and indifference by these workers. I assume nannies get paid better than the workers at a nursing home.
April 6, 2:38 pm
Bob from Gerritsen Beach says:
To Reply to Bob, of course it's a form of abuse and my heart went out to these poor kids because I know their parents entrusted the care to these Nannie. My wife who worked with per-first grade children for 28 years told me that when she sees a child in a baby carriage she could tell immediately if this is a day care child. The telltale sign is that the child doesn't smile, doesn't respond to people walking by because they're not taught to stimulate their curiosity when they're placed in virtual holding pens in day care. Nannies know all the right answers to give to prospective parents who hire them to take care of their child. These poor parents actually think that these people are going to take care of their children as if it were their own when in fact it's only a job. My advice to them is to cut down on their spending so they can quit their jobs and raise the children on their own or wait to have children until they could afford them on one income. I guarantee these parents would find it more rewarding to raise their own children than any benefits they would get from that job.
April 6, 10:09 pm

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